Saturday Open Thread | Country Music | Toby Keith

Toby-KeithToby Keith Covel (born July 8, 1961), best known as Toby Keith, is an American country music singer-songwriter, record producer, and actor. Keith released his first four studio albums—1993’s Toby Keith, 1994’s Boomtown, 1996’s Blue Moon and 1997’s Dream Walkin’, plus a Greatest Hits package for various divisions of Mercury Records before leaving Mercury in 1998. These albums all earned gold or higher certification, and produced several chart singles, including his debut “Should’ve Been a Cowboy“, which topped the country charts and was the most played country song of the 1990s. The song has received three million spins since its release, according to Broadcast Music Incorporated.

Signed to DreamWorks Records Nashville in 1998, Keith released his breakthrough single “How Do You Like Me Now?!” that year. This song, the title track to his 1999 album of the same name, was the Number One country song of 2000, and one of several chart-toppers during his tenure on DreamWorks Nashville.

About SouthernGirl2

A Native Texan who adores baby kittens, loves horses, rodeos, pomegranates, & collect Eagles. Enjoys politics, games shows, & dancing to all types of music. Loves discussing and learning about different cultures. A Phi Theta Kappa lifetime member with a passion for Social & Civil Justice.
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77 Responses to Saturday Open Thread | Country Music | Toby Keith

  1. rikyrah says:

    About the Santa Barbara killer, Chauncey DeVega put up a post about him called

    Saturday, May 24, 2014
    ‘The True Alpha Male’: The Santa Barbara Mass Shooting, Elliot Rodger, and Aggrieved White Male Entitlement Syndrome

    http://www.chaunceydevega.com/2014/05/the-true-alpha-male-ucsb-mass-shooting.html

    and already the White folks are showing up saying that the killer wasn’t ‘ White’. That he’s ‘bi-racial’.

    they are as transparent as glass.

  2. rikyrah says:

    from TOD:

    carolyn
    May 24, 2014 at 11:08 pm

    Just one thought on the awful killings in Santa Barbara…..on ABC tonight I saw a part of one of the boy’s tapes. What I saw was a very spoiled rich boy, who had never dealt with anything negative in his life. He was having a major pity party, and had absolutely everything given to him. He is of a type that parents coddle, and try to protect from life.

    I see the results of this treatment….kids who are often home schooled, or sent to private “Christian” schools, so they will never come in contact with anything dirty or threatening. I see this boy as so entitled and protected he has no idea what is real in life, and no idea how to handle anything negative.

    I don’t know the parents, and don’t want to accuse them of anything, but I see this attitude in some young people whose parents don’t want them to experience anything negative. They have never learned how to deal with people, so resort to the TOO EASILY AVAILABLE guns.. How can anyone sitting in a BMW expect people to pity him???
    And the police said he was a “perfectly polite, kind and wonderful human.” Do you trust police? I don’t. That is total dereliction of duty and willful blindness.

  3. rikyrah says:

    Michele Chambers ‏@michelec64 Protected Tweets 14m
    RIP Billy Clyde Tuggle // RT @TVLine ALL MY CHILDREN Vet Matthew Cowles Dead at 69; Husband to Christine Baranski

  4. Elliot Rodger detailed his whole plan online

    My Twisted World The Story of Elliot Rodger

    http://www.scribd.com/doc/225936731/Untitled

  5. Ametia says:

    and this right here too:

  6. rikyrah says:

    TheObamaDiary.com @TheObamaDiary
    Follow

    So now we’ll get 976 columns analyzing women’s treatment of ‘vulnerable’ men. If Elliot Rodger had darker skin it’d be ‘Good riddance, thug’
    7:24 PM – 24 May 2014

  7. rikyrah says:

    amira @captainamiricas
    Follow

    a white boy kills 7 people and he’s ‘disturbed.’ a black boy gets murdered trying to get home to watch a basketball game & he’s a thug #ucsb
    7:03 PM – 24 May 2014

  8. rikyrah says:

    Michael Tackett @tackettdc
    Follow

    Julian Castro would be first HUD Sec. whose parents lived and worked in public housing http://nyti.ms/1hiPt9r
    7:11 AM – 24 May 2014

  9. DAMN!!!!!!

    Santa Barbara shooter had history of posting racist, misogynist comments on hate site

    http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/05/24/santa-barbara-shooter-had-history-of-posting-racist-misogynist-comments-on-hate-site/

    According to the hate-tracking Southern Poverty Law Center, alleged Santa Barbara shooter Elliott Rodgers had a history of posting misogynist and racist comments on anti-woman website PuaHate.com.

    The family of Elliott Rodgers told authorities that they believe that it was their son who went on a rampage that left six dead and eleven injured in the Santa Barbara community of Isla Vista.

    (UPDATE): According to KCOY, three more more bodies were seen being removed from Rodgers’ apartment by Santa Barbara forensics experts this afternoon.

    PuaHate, ostensibly a website dedicated to criticizing pickup artists (PUA) and seduction experts who take money from men for tips on dating and getting sex, is known for its commenter’s misogynist remarks and objectification of women.

    According to the SPLC, Rodgers posted comments in January, beginning with “Saw a black guy sitting with 4 white girls,” causing him to admit his frustration over white women socializing with minority men:

    Today I drove through the area near my college and saw some things that were extremely rage-inducing.

    I passed by this restaurant and I saw this black guy chilling with 4 hot white girls. He didn’t even look good.

    Then later on in the day I was shopping at Trader Joe’s and saw an Indian guy with 2 above average White Girls!!!

    What rage-inducing sights did you guys see today? Don’t you just hate seeing these things when you go out? It just makes you want to quit life.

  10. Alleged Gunman’s Apartment Now A Crime Scene

    http://m.keyt.com/news/alleged-gunmans-apartment-now-a-crime-scene/26157468

    ISLA VISTA, Calif. –
    UPDATE: Santa Barbara County’s Sheriff’s scheduled news conference postponed until 5:00 p.m.

    The Santa Barbara County Coroner’s team has established a crime scene at the apartment complex where suspected shooter Elliot Rodger claimed he lived, prior to Friday’s mass murders in Isla Vista.

    NewsChannel 3 witnessed forensics experts removing three bodies from the Capri apartment complex on the 6500 block of Seville Road Saturday afternoon.

    There is no confirmation from authorities whether this latest discovery increases the number of people killed, which stands at seven, including the gunman.

    The timing is significant based on a more than one hundred page manifesto Rodger allegedly published hours before the killings.

    “On the day before the Day of Retribution, I will start the First Phase of my vengeance: Silently killing as many people as I can around Isla Vista by luring them into my apartment through some form of trickery.”

  11. Elliot Rodger

    “On the day before the Day of Retribution, I will start the First Phase of my vengeance: Silently killing as many people as I can around Isla Vista by luring them into my apartment through some form of trickery.”

  12. Yahtc says:

  13. rikyrah says:

    This I know…no good deed goes unpunished.

  14. rikyrah says:

    Who’ll control the Internet’s tubes?
    05/23/14 02:37 PM—Updated 05/23/14 02:39 PM
    By Steve Benen
    When the issue is net neutrality, congressional Republicans say they’re afraid of the federal government having control over the future of the Internet. When the issue is the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), those same GOP lawmakers say they’re afraid of the federal government losing control over the future of the Internet.

    The House voted Thursday to delay the Obama administration’s plans to relinquish the United States’ oversight of fundamental Internet functions.

    In a 245-177 vote – including 17 Democrats – the House approved a Republican amendment that would halt the administration’s plans to end its contract with the company that coordinates Internet addresses…. [Rep. John Shimkus’ (R-Ill.)] amendment would require the Government Accountability Office to conduct a study before the Commerce Department can proceed with its plans to hand off its oversight role of the system.

    As political debates go, this one’s been lurking in the background the last few months, with complaints largely limited to conservative circles. Fox News helped get the ball rolling in March – viewers were told that rascally President Obama chose unilaterally to “give away” the Internet – but it’s been percolating ever since. (Republican support for the measure yesterday was unanimous.)

    http://www.msnbc.com/rachel-maddow-show/wholl-control-the-internets-tubes

  15. rikyrah says:

    Christie ‘was hoping to ride a boom that never happened’
    05/23/14 10:24 AM—Updated 05/23/14 10:32 AM
    By Steve Benen

    It’s hard to imagine how much worse 2014 can get for New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R).

    Clearly, “Bridgegate” and the related scandals have taken a severe toll on the governor, his credibility, and his national standing. His poor job-creation record made matters worse. The fact that New Jersey’s debt has been downgraded six times, in part due to Christie’s decision to ignore warnings about unreliable budget projections, added insult to injury.

    But the Star-Ledger’s Tom Moran argues that this week, the bottom fell out. State pension reform, the “landmark achievement” of the governor’s first term in office, is no more.

    http://www.msnbc.com/rachel-maddow-show/christie-was-hoping-ride-boom

  16. rikyrah says:

    this Slave Catcher here

    ……………………….

    Fox’s Allen West Attacks Decorated Vet Rep. Tammy Duckworth: I “Don’t Know Where Her Loyalties Lie”
    May 22, 2014 10:49 AM EDT
    ERIC HANANOKI

    Fox News contributor Allen West questioned the “loyalties” of decorated veteran and Illinois Rep. Tammy Duckworth for serving with her fellow Democrats on the Benghazi select committee.

    West attacked the recently announced Democratic members of the newly formed committee for dismissing the importance of Benghazi during an appearance on the May 21 broadcast of The Janet Mefferd Show.

    West remarked of Duckworth: “I just don’t know where her loyalties lie. You know, for her to have been a veteran, a wounded warrior for the United States Army, she should know that this is not the right thing. And hopefully, you know, she will remember the oath of office that she took as an Army officer and not the allegiance I guess she believes she has to the liberal progressives of the Democrat Party.”

    As her congressional biography notes, Duckworth “was one of the first Army women to fly combat missions during Operation Iraqi Freedom until her helicopter was hit by an RPG on November 12, 2004. Duckworth lost her legs and partial use of her right arm in the explosion and was awarded a Purple Heart for her combat injuries.” She became a well-known advocate for veterans, and served as the director of the Illinois Department of Veterans’ Affairs and then Assistant Secretary of Veterans Affairs on the federal level. She is currently a Lieutenant Colonel in the Illinois Army National Guard.

    West is also a decorated veteran of the war in Iraq, albeit one whose service ended in controversy. He subsequently served one term in Congress, becoming a Fox News contributor after Florida voters declined to reelect him. During the interview, he also attacked Reps. Elijah Cummings, Adam Schiff, Adam Smith, and Linda Sanchez, the other Democratic appointees to the Benghazi select committee. West claimed that Smith is “one of those geeky little debaters that is going to try to micromanage every single detail,” while Sanchez has a “very whiny way.”

    http://mediamatters.org/blog/2014/05/22/foxs-allen-west-attacks-decorated-vet-rep-tammy/199424

  17. rikyrah says:

    May 23, 2014 4:17 PM
    No, Cutting Off Unemployment Insurance Doesn’t Make Those Bums Go To Work

    By Ed Kilgore

    It’s now been close to five months since Congress failed to extend long-term unemployment insurance thanks to Republican opposition. I’m sure you remember some of the arguments made about why an extension wasn’t necessary or might even be counterproductive. At FiveThirtyEight, Ben Casselman reviews those arguments in light of subsequent evidence, and finds them rather notably weak:

    The case against extending unemployment benefits essentially boils down to two arguments. First, the economy has improved, so the unemployed should no longer need extra time to find a new job. Second, extended benefits could lead job seekers either to not search as hard or to become choosier about the kind of job they will accept, ultimately delaying their return to the workforce.

    But the evidence doesn’t support either of those arguments. The economy has indeed improved, but not for the long-term unemployed, whose odds of finding a job are barely higher today than when the recession ended nearly five years ago. And the end of extended benefits hasn’t spurred the unemployed back to work; if anything, it has pushed them out of the labor force altogether.

    http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/political-animal-a/2014_05/no_cutting_off_unemployment_in050490.php

  18. rikyrah says:

    May 23, 2014 12:06 PM
    Countering the Minimum Wage With More Help For “Lucky Duckies”

    By Ed Kilgore

    One of the key contributors and promoters of the “reform conservative” cause (and the new “manifesto” Room to Grow), Ramesh Ponnuru, has a Bloomberg View column making the fairly obvious suggestion about how Republicans might respond to the drive for a higher minimum wage:

    One way to do so is to support expanding the earned income tax credit, an earnings subsidy that targets poor households much better than the minimum wage does and poses no threat of destroying jobs. That credit may not be as easily understood as the minimum wage, but it would give Republicans a way to show that they want to help the poor — and that their stated objections to raising the minimum wage are sincere.

    He might have added that the EITC used to be a very popular initiative among conservatives, from Ronald Reagan to George W. Bush.

    But not any more, as both Jonathan Chait and Ezra Klein quickly pointed out. Here’s Ezra’s brisk summary of the Republican revolt against the EITC:

    The most recent Republican budget lets a stimulus-era boost in the EITC to expire and, on top of that, includes huge cuts to the part of the budget (the “income security budget function,” for wonks) that houses the EITC.

    But it’s worse than that: the EITC has been largely responsible for eliminating federal income tax liability among low-income Americans. And that has become a deep source of grievance, and even of conspiracy theories, among conservatives at both the elite and grassroots level. The classic slam at the EITC was articulated by the Wall Street Journal editorial board, which got into the habit of referring to poor people who didn’t owe federal income tax as “lucky duckies.” This in turn became integral to the popular conservative theory that people who didn’t pay income taxes didn’t bear the cost of governing (an argument, of course, that ignored all the other kinds of taxes the poor pay, often at regressive rates), and thus represented looters who voted themselves more and more of other people’s money.

    I personally became convinced this had become an important part of conservative demonology when watching Rick Perry make his statement of presidential candidacy in 2011, at a RedState gathering in South Carolina. In the midst of an extended tirade about the need for lower taxes, Perry suddenly blasted “the injustice that nearly half of all Americans don’t even pay any income tax.” The crowd responded with what I described at the time as a “feral roar.” So it wasn’t surprising a year or so later when Mitt Romney got caught buying into the same idea in his “47 percent” comments, about “people who pay no income tax” but nonetheless receive federal benefits.

    Even if they didn’t rely on EITC cuts to pay for upper-end tax cuts in their budget schemes, Republicans seem to have developed a moral aversion to the EITC that’s more important to them than finding a sensible alternative to minimum wage increases. So Ponnuru is almost certainly barking up the wrong tree.

    One of the key contributors and promoters of the “reform conservative” cause (and the new “manifesto” Room to Grow), Ramesh Ponnuru, has a Bloomberg View column making the fairly obvious suggestion about how Republicans might respond to the drive for a higher minimum wage:

    One way to do so is to support expanding the earned income tax credit, an earnings subsidy that targets poor households much better than the minimum wage does and poses no threat of destroying jobs. That credit may not be as easily understood as the minimum wage, but it would give Republicans a way to show that they want to help the poor — and that their stated objections to raising the minimum wage are sincere.

    He might have added that the EITC used to be a very popular initiative among conservatives, from Ronald Reagan to George W. Bush.

    But not any more, as both Jonathan Chait and Ezra Klein quickly pointed out. Here’s Ezra’s brisk summary of the Republican revolt against the EITC:

    The most recent Republican budget lets a stimulus-era boost in the EITC to expire and, on top of that, includes huge cuts to the part of the budget (the “income security budget function,” for wonks) that houses the EITC.

    But it’s worse than that: the EITC has been largely responsible for eliminating federal income tax liability among low-income Americans. And that has become a deep source of grievance, and even of conspiracy theories, among conservatives at both the elite and grassroots level. The classic slam at the EITC was articulated by the Wall Street Journal editorial board, which got into the habit of referring to poor people who didn’t owe federal income tax as “lucky duckies.” This in turn became integral to the popular conservative theory that people who didn’t pay income taxes didn’t bear the cost of governing (an argument, of course, that ignored all the other kinds of taxes the poor pay, often at regressive rates), and thus represented looters who voted themselves more and more of other people’s money.

    I personally became convinced this had become an important part of conservative demonology when watching Rick Perry make his statement of presidential candidacy in 2011, at a RedState gathering in South Carolina. In the midst of an extended tirade about the need for lower taxes, Perry suddenly blasted “the injustice that nearly half of all Americans don’t even pay any income tax.” The crowd responded with what I described at the time as a “feral roar.” So it wasn’t surprising a year or so later when Mitt Romney got caught buying into the same idea in his “47 percent” comments, about “people who pay no income tax” but nonetheless receive federal benefits.

    Even if they didn’t rely on EITC cuts to pay for upper-end tax cuts in their budget schemes, Republicans seem to have developed a moral aversion to the EITC that’s more important to them than finding a sensible alternative to minimum wage increases. So Ponnuru is almost certainly barking up the wrong tree.

  19. rikyrah says:

    It’s Time to Stop the Immigration Reform Charade

    —By Kevin Drum
    | Fri May 23, 2014 10:45 AM EDT

    John Boehner says he’d really, really love to pass immigration reform, but darn it, President Obama’s arbitrary and lawless regulatory changes to Obamacare make that impossible. Republicans no longer trust Obama to enforce whatever law they pass, so they’re stuck.

    This is a contrivance so obvious that I think most five-year-olds could see through it, but that’s Boehner’s story and he’s sticking to it. So Harry Reid has now made official what used to be merely idle chatter:

    http://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2014/05/its-time-stop-immigration-reform-charade

  20. rikyrah says:

    Morning Plum: Republicans getting away with utter gibberish on Obamacare

    By Greg Sargent
    May 20 at 9:05 am

    Today Georgia primary voters choose a GOP nominee to face Michelle Nunn, who has emerged as an unexpectedly strong challenger on deep-red turf. Also today, Nunn’s position on Obamacare continues to receive national media scrutiny, as well it should.

    But how about some scrutiny of the evasions, gyrations and equivocations we’re seeing from top-tier Republican Senate candidates on the very same issue?

    Nunn came under media fire for refusing to say whether she would have voted for Obamacare if she’d been in the Senate at the time. The Associated Press picked up on Nunn’s evasions last night, and today Politico also weighs in, reporting that Nunn refused to answer questions on the topic.

    Nunn needs a better answer to this question. Her approach to Obamacare has been too cute by half. But by any measure, the handling of health care by multiple Republican Senate candidates has been at least as ridiculous.

    Local media have been pressing GOP Senate candidates in states where versions of the Medicaid expansion are moving forward to answer a simple question: For or against? In Arkansas, David Ramsey can only get word salad from Tom Cotton. In Michigan, local reporters can’t get anything clear out of Terri Lynn Land. And the Boston Globe (more of a national outlet) been unable to get an answer from New Hampshire candidate Scott Brown. In North Carolina, Thom Tillis’ stance on repeal is comically incoherent.

    National media have not really registered any of this. (One exception is Kyle Cheney’s great look at Brown’s Obamacare buffoonery.) In some ways, this is perhaps understandable. The out-party can win by simply running against the in-party, with the details not necessarily mattering much. And it’s certainly on Democrats to make GOP equivocations on Obamacare a major issue.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/plum-line/wp/2014/05/20/morning-plum-republicans-getting-away-with-utter-gibberish-on-obamacare/

  21. rikyrah says:

    Shifting Views on Gay Marriage Now Favor Democrats
    DENVER May 23, 2014 (AP)
    By NICHOLAS RICCARDI Associated Press

    It wasn’t all that long ago that Republicans used gay marriage as a tool to drive Election Day turnout. But as public opinion on the issue has turned and courts strike down same-sex marriage bans, gay rights is evolving into a wedge issue for Democrats to wield.

    Consider Pennsylvania, where Democrats have lambasted Republican Gov. Tom Corbett for comparing gay marriage to incest. Facing a tough re-election campaign, Corbett decided this week not to appeal a federal court ruling striking down the state’s ban of gay marriage.

    Or Colorado, where Democratic Sen. Mark Udall is hitting his Republican challenger for casting votes that denied gay people protection from discrimination. In Arizona, Democrats plan to hammer Republican legislators who passed a law allowing businesses to refuse to serve gays for religious reasons.

    “We’re just beginning to see this, and we will see a lot more in the midterms,” said Richard Socarides, an activist who was President Bill Clinton’s adviser on gay rights. “It will be an incredible shift by the time we get to the (presidential) election in 2016.”

    That election will arrive 20 years after Republicans in Congress passed the Defense of Marriage Act, which prohibited federal recognition of same-sex marriage. Clinton signed the bill defensively, worried the GOP would use it as a campaign issue, Socarides said. Republican activists put anti-gay marriage initiatives on the ballot in 11 states in 2004, helping President George W. Bush win re-election with the support of conservative religious voters motivated to turn out to support the bans.

    http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/switch-gay-rights-wedge-democrats-23837453?singlePage=true

  22. rikyrah says:

    Repealing Obamacare Is Out. “Fixing Healthcare” Is In.
    By David Weigel

    Over at the Cook Political Report, Elizabeth Wilner writes that Republican pollsters have moved on from “repeal” of Obamacare as their 2014 message.

    Pointing to Public Opinion Strategies national omnibus polling data showing equal percentages of Americans ready to support candidates who want to “keep and fix” the ACA and “repeal and replace” it, [Republican pollster Bill] McInturff suggested we will see a rhetorical shift in how Republicans advertise about the law. For example, ads might include more precise examples of what aspects of the law they would repeal, or more people providing testimonials to how they’ve been hurt by reform.

    The shift is underway already. In a new-ish ad for Massachusetts candidate Richard Tisei, the Chamber promises its endorsee will “work in a bipartisan manner to fix health the right way.’

    http://www.slate.com/blogs/weigel/2014/05/23/out_repeal_obamacare_in_fix_health_care.html

  23. rikyrah says:

    I’m not a Democrat. I’m an anti-Republican.
    The return of Benghazi is the latest evidence that the GOP is putting its unhinged obsessions before the good of the country
    By Damon Linker | May 13, 2014

    B

    ack in March 2013, I wrote a column titled, “Why I am no longer a Republican.” A more accurate (though admittedly more ponderous) title would have been, “One important reason among many that I am no longer a Republican.”

    That important reason was the Iraq War, which I never supported and which the Bush administration and its legion of defenders in Washington and around the country justified in terms that struck me at the time as highly ideological, fundamentally anti-empirical, and more than a little paranoid. Let’s just say that nothing that happened after the initial invasion persuaded me that my original instincts were wrong.

    If the Iraq War debacle had been an isolated incident — one that Republicans forthrightly acknowledged as a mistake and showed signs of learning from — it’s possible that I wouldn’t have bolted the party.

    But it wasn’t an isolated incident. It was the start of a whole new era for the GOP — an era in which the stridently ideological, anti-empirical, and paranoid tendencies that gained the upper hand in the run-up to the Iraq War (and which had always been present in certain factions of the conservative movement) infected the party from top to bottom, corrupting its thinking on foreign and domestic policy and inspiring its lockstep opposition to the Obama administration’s governing agenda from day one.

    Today, my voting record says I’m a Democrat. I voted for Kerry in 2004 and Obama in 2008 and 2012. I nearly always support Democrats in House, Senate, and gubernatorial elections. But I don’t identify closely with or feel deep loyalty to the Democratic Party, its agenda, or its electoral coalition.

    http://theweek.com//article/index/261426/irsquom-not-a-democrat-irsquom-an-anti-republican

  24. rikyrah says:

    Veterans’ Health Care is Still the Best

    by BooMan
    Sat May 24th, 2014 at 09:21:08 AM EST

    It was difficult for me to watch my brother Phil testify before Bernie Sanders’ Senate Veterans’ Affairs Committee last week because he talked about the death of his wife, Robin, and how that experience led him to investigate the nation’s health care system. Robin was younger than I am now when she died of an aggressive form of breast cancer. Her loss was a brutal and unfair blow to both my brother and our entire family, and seeing him testify about her in front of the whole nation made me very emotional.

    Phil’s journey into our health care system began with that tragedy, and he concluded that the Veterans’ health care system was the best-performing system in the country. He still feels that way.

    Ezra Klein: You titled your book on the Veteran’s Health Administration “The Best Care Anywhere.” Do you still believe that’s true?

    Phil Longman: To the specific issue at hand on whether or not there were secret waiting lists at Phoenix and possibly other hospitals, we just don’t know. There’s strong evidence that employees at those facilities engaged in some kind of gaming of their performance metrics. But we’re still waiting for the investigation to finish.

    But the big question with these stories about the VA is, “compared to what?” This scandal wouldn’t exist if the VA didn’t have performance metrics on its employees. If it didn’t measure or care whether veterans get prompt appointments it could just do what the rest of the health-care system has done and not hold people responsible for these metrics. Now, certain people seem to have cheated on this metric. But that’s far better than what goes on in the rest of the health-care system where no one is accountable for this at all.

    http://www.boomantribune.com/story/2014/5/24/9218/10810

  25. rikyrah says:

    Yes, opposition to Obamacare is tied up with race

    By Paul Waldman
    May 23 at 2:55 pm

    Is opposition to Obamacare really about race? That’s the highly charged question that has bubbled up in the last day or so, starting with a Senate hearing and then bursting into the news media. I won’t keep you in suspense: The answer is, “Yes, but . . . .” Not all opposition to the Affordable Care Act, and not from all people, and not at all times. But two things are clearly true. First, some conservatives with large megaphones have worked hard to use the ACA as a tool of race-baiting, encouraging their white audiences to see the law through a racial lens. And second, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that race plays a role in many people’s opposition to the law.

    Before we get into details, this is coming up now because of an exchange between senators Jay Rockefeller (D-W.Va.) and Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) at a hearing. Here’s how it started:

    “It’s very important to take a long view at what’s going on here. And I’ll be able to dig up some emails that make part of the Affordable Care Act that doesn’t look good, especially from people who have made up their mind that they don’t want it to work. Because they don’t like the president, maybe he’s of the wrong color. Something of that sort,” Rockefeller said. “I’ve seen a lot of that and I know a lot of that to be true. It’s not something you’re meant to talk about in public, but it’s something I’m talking about in public because that is very true.”

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/plum-line/wp/2014/05/23/yes-opposition-to-obamacare-is-tied-up-with-race/

  26. rikyrah says:

    so this dude in Cali killed 6 women cause he couldn’t get laid?

    ARE YOU FUCKING SERIOUS?

  27. rikyrah says:

    Joy Reid ✔ @JoyAnnReid
    Follow

    I’m convinced that part of the relentless fury at President Obama is a desire to bring him down to parity with Bush, ITO lost esteem.
    8:57 PM – 23 May 2014

  28. Yahtc says:

    On stereotyping, prejudice, and hate history:

  29. Tiffany Williams

    While Mark Cuban is worried about young Black males with hoodies, White Boys shooting and killing innocent White people in upscale Santa Barbara!

    • Ametia says:

      Not to mention the MASS shootings around the USA, Columbine, Aurora, AZ, WI, CT, the list goes on and on. Cuban should be worried and disgusted by the gun-toting white boys shooting innocent children and adults, because you know according to the media they’re “TROUBLED.”

  30. rikyrah says:

    Coates is on MHP this morning.

  31. rikyrah says:

    Good Morning, Everyone :)

    Off to swim and run errands.

  32. Yahtc says:

    https://twitter.com/WALBNews10/status/470015079157882880/photo/1/large

    LEE COUNTY, GA (WALB) –
    A brave little Lee County boy is now being called a hero. He calmly called 911 after his mother passed out. And with the help from dispatchers he was able to save the day.

    Dispatcher: “Lee County 911.”
    Jaden Howe: “My mommy is passed out and she can’t talk. She’s on the floor.”

    4 year-old Jaden Howe didn’t know what was wrong with his mom. “I think she was really sad,” said Jaden.

    But he knew she wasn’t responding and he needed help.

    “I had given him a bath, put some clothes on him and then as I was walking out from his room in the hallway I was about to call my husband I fell,” said Juana Snell.

    Snell says she passed out at their home Tuesday and that’s when her son sprung into action, calling 911.

    “We’ve practiced. We went over the numbers and how to press the green button. Thank god he remembered,” said Snell.

    Dispatcher: “What’s your address?”
    Jaden: “Uh…what’s our address Mommy? Mommy!”

    Little Jaden called from his mom’s cell phone, but couldn’t remember his address.

    Dispatcher: “Do you know your neighbor?”
    Jaden: “Yes.”
    Dispatcher: “Is your Momma awake?”
    Jaden: “No, she’s on the ground with her eyes closed and she can’t move.”

    The dispatcher told Jaden to go to his neighbor’s house so they could get an exact location.
    He stayed on the phone with the dispatcher until he got to her house, then hung up. But the neighbor called back and paramedics were on their way just as Snell became conscious.

    “I said it’s going to be fine,” said Jaden.
    “He did say that. He said it’s going to be just fine Mommy,” said Snell.

    And Snell still can’t believe her playful four year-old saved the day. “The funniest thing is that he was just so calm. Because when I woke up when the paramedics came in he was like a little grown man.”

    While little Jaden wants to be a builder when he grows up.. Right now he’s got a pretty special job being a hero.

    “I was so happy that I wasn’t alone, that he was here with me and is my little hero. Right?” said Snell. “Right,” said Jaden.

    Snell was treated at her home on Tuesday. She ended up going to the hospital Thursday and was diagnosed with a severe sinus infection.

  33. Cowboy cousin

    Cowboy cousin22

  34. Good morning, everyone!

    Enjoy your holiday weekend. Stay safe!

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