Civil Rights Tribute: Celebrating The Dream..

Dr. Martin Luther KingThe March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom (or “The Great March on Washington“, as styled in a sound recording released after the event)[1][2] was one of the largest political rallies for human rights in United States history [3] and called for civil and economic rights for African Americans. It took place in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday, August 28, 1963. Martin Luther King, Jr., standing in front of the Lincoln Memorial, delivered his historic “I Have a Dream” speech advocating racial harmony during the march.[4]

The march was organized by a group of civil rights, labor, and religious organizations,[5] under the theme “jobs, and freedom.”[4] Estimates of the number of participants varied from 200,000 (police) to over 300,000 (leaders of the march). Observers estimated that 75–80% of the marchers were black and the rest were white and non-black minorities.

Dr. Martin Luther King: Let us march on ballot boxes, march on ballot boxes until race-baiters disappear from the political arena.

Dr. Martin Luther King:Let us march on the ballot boxes until the Wallaces of our Nation tremble away in silence.

Dr. Martin Luther King: Let us march on poverty until no American parent has to skip a meal so their children may eat.

Dr. Martin Luther King: Let us march on ballot boxes, until we send to our city councils, state legislatures, and the United States Congress men who will not fear to do justice, love mercy, and walk humbly with their God.

Dr. Martin Luther King: We will be the participants in a great building process that will make America a new nation. And we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. This is our challenge. This is the way we must grapple with this dilemma, and we will be a great people.

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About SouthernGirl2

A Native Texan who adores baby kittens, loves horses, rodeos, pomegranates, & collect Eagles. Enjoys politics, games shows, & dancing to all types of music. Loves discussing and learning about different cultures. A Phi Theta Kappa lifetime member with a passion for Social & Civil Justice.
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7 Responses to Civil Rights Tribute: Celebrating The Dream..

  1. Pingback: The Words of Dr King | Humane Exposures Blog

  2. Ametia says:

    The DREAM lives on, Dr. King.

    Like

  3. Bull Connor and the Civil Rights Movement

    Like

  4. http://www.infoplease.com/spot/mlkspeeches.html#axzz0xt2TWdsR

    March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom — August 28, 1963

    The March on Washington took place in Washington, D.C., and was attended by 250,000 people. King’s speech at the March remains one of the most famous speeches in American history. King started with prepared remarks but then departed from his script, shifting into the “I have a dream” theme he’d used on prior occasions, speaking of an America where his children “will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.” He followed this with an exhortation to “let freedom ring” across the nation, and concluded with:

    I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.” I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slaveowners will be able to sit down together at a table of brotherhood. I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a desert state, sweltering with the heat of injustice and oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. I have a dream today.

    Like

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