Thursday Open Thread | Sheryl Crow Week

About Ametia

I am a Spiritual traveler, a devoted wife, mother, sister, lover of dream study, reading, theater, music, dance, and thought-provoking discussions on love, life, humor and service.
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45 Responses to Thursday Open Thread | Sheryl Crow Week

  1. rikyrah says:

    BWA HA HA HA HA HA HA

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Little birdie, why do you fly upside-down?
    It’s amazing at the way you get around
    Little birdie, why you worry like you do?
    Don’t you worry, you just do what you can do….

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Josh posted this in our family group. I told him, I see you, Joshua! I cook a lot of food. LOL!

    Liked by 3 people

  4. yahtzeebutterfly says:

    “A ‘Routine’ Stop Almost Ended My Career Before It Started Sometimes there’s danger in speaking out against perceived police misconduct.”
    https://www.themarshallproject.org/2017/11/15/a-routine-stop-almost-ended-my-career-before-it-started?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter&utm_source=opening-statement&utm_term=newsletter-20171116-893

    Like

  5. rikyrah says:

    Grassley rips up ‘blue slip’ for a pair of Trump court picks
    11/16/2017 03:30 PM EST

    Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley is burning the blue slip for some judicial nominees.

    The Iowa Republican will announce later Thursday that he is going ahead with a confirmation hearing for a nominee to the powerful appellate courts despite the objections of a Democrat who had been blocking the nomination for months.

    The move will likely escalate the judicial wars in the Senate.

    Grassley says he has scheduled hearings for David Stras, a nominee to the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.), Stras’ home-state senator, said earlier this year that he would not return the so-called blue slip for Stras because of his conservative ideology.

    https://www.politico.com/story/2017/11/16/chuck-grassley-trump-court-picks-245367

    Like

  6. rikyrah says:

    From POU:

    GOVCHRIS1988
    I wrote this over at ThePeoplesView, where they are going apeshit. Its just how I feel.

    THIS is why I’m not tripping over this.

    MY GOD, for once, can Liberals have some nuts before taking their Samarai Swords and cutting their own goddamn jugulars. This shit is EXACTLY why we’re once state legislative seat from ALEC rewriting our fucking constitution., I fucking wonder why we don’t have power at times, but this rolls around and every Liberal panics like Godzilla has just invaded their town, and I see why. I’m sorry, but this shit needs to be admitted, Republicans play politics better than we do. Every time, they do this shit, and Liberals always go around saying “We’re better than them, so we must do this.” and play into their hands every time. We laud ourselves for “moral victories” that don’t mean shit while Republicans put ghost hunters in the Judiciary. CHRIST! We gain NOTHING from trying to be Pollyanna with voters. We’re trying to apologize for supporting Clinton while we have an admitted pussygrabber as president and haven’t seen one Republican apologize for that. I haven’t seen one call for an investigation into ANY of Trump’s allegations, yet Al Franken gets a senate ethics investigation over bullshit he did 11 years ago as a comedian. We’re throwing away a guy, while Republicans bearhug theirs. Oh yes, we’re morally right though. Fuck wish we had some power to go with that morally righteousness, like maybe Congress, the Presidency, the Supreme Court, the Federal Judiciary, The majority of state legislatures.

    Look, I’m not saying that sexual assault and molestation shouldn’t be taken seriously. I’m not saying that Al Franken shouldn’t atone for this and it should be a teachable lesson that men shouldn’t touch a woman unprompted, even for jokes anymore. That we shouldn’t use women as playthings for our enjoyment or use our positions in entertainment or politics as a way to get easy ass or expect everyone to give it to us because of that. Nor, should we practice our perversions on women who are just simply expecting a meeting, not a quickie, a meeting. Times have changed and behavior that was sanctioned in the past is not sanctioned now and that will make for a better world. But I also believe in not overdoing this shit. That means not writing an article apologizing for backing or defending Bill Clinton, especially if you are a 36 year old millennial that wasn’t even goddamned old enough to vote for Clinton. I’m also NOT going to believe Juanita Broadderick, the rightwing puppet woman that backed the pussygrabber in chief who even Ken Starr didn’t use in his crusade against Clinton because she was untrustworthy as hell and recanted her statements under oath and refused to recant THOSE statements under oath today. Look, we can and should admit that for many years that many women have been ignored, stifled, and downright abused when they dared to be brave and speak up about their experiences. Many of them suffered job losses, had livelihoods and relationships upended, had their mental and physical health harmed. Every woman should have a hearing and be taken seriously when the question of sexual misconduct against them is brought up. But we also shouldn’t overdo it in our quest to make up for those years of ignoring them and just automatically believe everybody just to make ourselves feel like were doing good instead of actually doing good. We have to accept that some folks will abuse that and will use that for their nefarious ends. Like Roger Stone and Sean Hannity are doing with this woman today.

    Roy Moore is still poison. He preyed on innocent little girls, not grown ass women. He was booted from a fucking mall because he was such a snarling letch. He used court cases and his position to allow plenty of sexual molesters like himself off of their crimes, thus allowing them to keep doing it. I’m sorry, but this is worse than what Al Franken did and I make NO apologies for saying that. I’ve always believed Moore would win, simply because this is Alabama, red as blood. They are a state ripe with open incest, sexual molestation and inbreeding under the guise of THEIR word of God. I live in the neighboring state of Georgia, trust me on this. And Roy Moore ain’t the first one, Dennis Hastert anyone? I’m just saying Liberals, BE SMARTER.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. rikyrah says:

    Just for laughs

    Like

  8. Like

  9. Liza says:

    Like

  10. Ametia says:

    Rikyrah, did you watch last night?

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Ametia says:

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Liza says:

    This is my “representative” Congress. I can’t even troll her Twitter TL without a blood pressure spike. When will this end????

    Like

  13. Ametia says:

    The Buffoon (as eliihass calls him), is back from his 12 day suck-up tour.

    Like

  14. Like

  15. Call for an Ethics Committee review of Trump too. He bragged about grabbing women’s private parts on video.

    Like

  16. rikyrah says:

    The tax bill Senate Republicans are championing would give large tax cuts to millionaires while raising taxes on American families earning $10,000 to $75,000 over the next decade, according to an analysis released Thursday by the Joint Committee on Taxation, Congress’ official nonpartisan analysts.

    President Trump and Republican lawmakers have been heralding their bill as a win for hard-working Americans, but the JCT report casts serious doubt on that claim. Tax hikes for households earning $10,000 to $30,000 would start in 2021 and grow sharply from there. By the year 2027, Americans earning $30,000 to $75,000 a year would also be forced to pay more in taxes even though people earning over $100,000 continue to get substantial tax cuts.

    Like

  17. Ametia says:

    Quantifying the Influence of Black Consumers

    Perennially noted for cultural innovation and being on the cusp of the latest trends that embody America, Black consumers are one of America’s greatest assets. “What’s next?” for Black consumers is actually happening right now. Recognizing the contributions of African-Americans is steeped in a storied tradition of celebrating trailblazers and those less-familiar hidden figures whose advancements and contributions have impacted science, technology, manufacturing, media, and entertainment.

    http://sites.nielsen.com/africanamericans/

    Liked by 1 person

  18. rikyrah says:

    During the Weinstein story, CNN had a clock counting the hours it took Hillary Clinton to respond. Seven days later and Donald Trump, the president and GOP leader, still hasn’t said a single word on Roy Moore.— Matt McDermott (@mattmfm) November 16, 2017

    Like

  19. rikyrah says:

    THE RACHEL MADDOW SHOW 11/15/17
    Alabama GOP standing by Roy Moore despite new lurid accusations
    Rachel Maddow relays reports that despite four new women coming forward today with stories of being pursued by Roy Moore as schoolgirls, the Alabama Republican Party is sticking with Roy Moore as their candidate for Senate.

    Like

  20. rikyrah says:

    THE RACHEL MADDOW SHOW 11/15/17
    Democrats feeling new energy, flipping seats in red Oklahoma
    Anna Langthorn, new chair of the Oklahoma Democratic Party, talks with Rachel Maddow about recent blue victories in her very red state and the momentum she hopes to build with her party.

    Like

  21. rikyrah says:

    THE RACHEL MADDOW SHOW 11/15/17
    Senator Warren: GOP tax bill a “double punch” to middle class
    Senator Elizabeth Warren talks with Rachel Maddow about the consequences for the American middle class if the Republicans are able to pass their their tax/health care bill.

    THE RACHEL MADDOW SHOW 11/15/17
    Warren: New Consumer chief needs record resisting Wall Street
    Senator Elizabeth Warren talks with Rachel Maddow about the resignation of Richard Cordray from the Consumer Financial Protection Board and the kind of person the American people need to replace him.

    Like

  22. rikyrah says:

    THE RACHEL MADDOW SHOW 11/15/17
    GOP follows string of failures with ill-conceived tax plan
    Rachel Maddow reviews the string of failures by the current Republican Congress which it hopes to break with a new, wildly unpopular tax plan that they have not done a good job of disguising as not being designed to benefit rich people.

    Like

  23. rikyrah says:

    no lie told in the comment at BJ:

    the Conster, la Citoyenne says:
    November 16, 2017 at 10:13 am

    Rust belt whites crawled over glass to vote for Trump because they hate. They hate hate hate Colin Kaepernick and Black Lives Matter. They want racism enforced. That’s all this support for Trump is about. I’ve avoided reading most of the 872,568 interviews of Trump voters, but the one where they went to Johnstown PA was the only one worth reading, and read to the end. It’s pure distilled Trumpism. They will never blame him for anything – they said as much – because he’s a hater too. Full stop.

    Like

  24. rikyrah says:

    ‘This is surreal’: descendants of slaves and slaveowners meet on US plantation
    At Prospect Hill in Mississippi, people came from as far as Liberia for an unlikely gathering that led to a scene of visible emotion – with ‘a lot to talk about’

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/nov/16/us-slavery-descendants-plantation-mississippi

    Liked by 3 people

    • yahtzeebutterfly says:

      How fabulous that this history has been preserved and that the descendants have been able to take part in the deeply moving reunion!

      Thank you so much for finding and posting this wonderful article, Rikyrah!.

      Like

  25. Liked by 1 person

  26. rikyrah says:

    Uh huh
    Uh huh

    White on White Voting

    Trump’s anti-immigrant, racially loaded messages resonated most powerfully among voters living in the least diverse, most racially isolated white communities. It is in these locales, which are experiencing the earliest signs of minority growth, that anxiety over approaching diversity is strongest.

    Put another way, anger, fear and animosity toward immigrants and minorities was most politically potent in the communities most insulated from these supposed threats.

    Orfield and Stancil’s work complements findings I reported on in a column last month that showed that Trump performed best in states and communities that were heavily white, but which had experienced relatively small increases in minority populations, notably from immigrants. While small in absolute numbers, the rate of growth represented by these increases was often exceptionally high: For example, if the nonwhite share of the population grew from 2 to 6 percent, the rate of growth was 200 percent.

    Trump clearly inflamed and mobilized white voters living in these circumstances. Neither Romney nor John McCain, the previous two Republican nominees, campaigned on racially freighted issues and neither produced the same pattern of support.

    Like

  27. rikyrah says:

    I’ve told you…I believe it’s ALL TRUE.

    Christopher Steele, the former British intelligence officer who compiled an explosive dossier of allegations of collusion between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin, believes it to be 70% to 90% accurate, according to a new book on the covert Russian intervention in the 2016 US election.

    The book, Collusion: How Russia Helped Donald Trump Win, by the Guardian journalist Luke Harding, quotes Steele as telling friends that he believes his reports – based on sources cultivated over three decades of intelligence work – will be vindicated as the US special counsel investigation digs deeper into contacts between Trump, his associates and Moscow.

    “I’ve been dealing with this country for 30 years. Why would I invent this stuff?” Steele is quoted as saying.

    One of the reasons his dossier was taken seriously in Washington in 2016 was Steele’s reputation in the US for producing reliable reports on Russia, according to Harding’s book.

    Between 2014 and 2016, he authored more than a hundred reports on Russia and Ukraine, which were commissioned by private clients but shared widely within the state department and passed across the desks of the secretary of state, John Kerry, and the assistant secretary Victoria Nuland, who led the US response to the annexation of Crimea and the covert invasion of eastern Ukraine.

    The sources for those reports were the same as those quoted in the dossier on Trump, which included allegations that the Kremlin had personally compromising material on the US president, including sex tapes recorded during a trip to Moscow in 2013, and that Trump and his associates actively colluded with Russian intelligence to influence the election in his favour.

    Years earlier, Steele shared the results of his investigation of the global football organisation, Fifa, with a senior FBI official in Rome; that led to an investigation by US federal prosecutors, and ultimately the arrest of seven Fifa officials.

    “The episode burnished Steele’s reputation inside the US intelligence community and the FBI. Here was a pro, a well-connected Brit, who understood Russian espionage and its subterranean tricks. Steele was regarded as credible,” Harding writes.

    Liked by 2 people

  28. rikyrah says:

    THE RACHEL MADDOW SHOW 11/15/17
    Still more women report past lurid Roy Moore behavior
    Beth Reinhard, Washington Post investigative reporter, talks with Rachel Maddow about two more women describing being sexually pursed as school girls by grown man Roy Moore, including one who was literally called on the phone by Moore at school.

    Like

  29. rikyrah says:

    On taxes, Republicans prioritize corporations over people
    11/16/17 09:20 AM—UPDATED 11/16/17 09:39 AM
    By Steve Benen
    One of the most memorable lines of the 2012 presidential campaign came when Mitt Romney lectured an Iowa voter, “Corporations are people, my friend.” Several years later, Romney’s Republican Party seems quite eager to help those “people” – even at the expense of actual people.

    The headline on today’s New York Times report is both brutal and accurate: “Republican Tax Plans Put Corporations Over People.”

    There are tough choices at the heart of the Republican tax bills speeding through Congress, and they make clear what the party values most in economic policy right now: deep and lasting tax cuts for corporations. […]

    The version of the bill moving through the Senate Finance Committee chooses to give peace of mind to corporate executives planning their long-term investments. That comes at the expense of added anxiety for individual taxpayers, particularly those in the middle class, who could face stiff tax increases on Jan. 1, 2026.

    Like

  30. rikyrah says:

    The polling on the GOP’s tax plan is starting to look almost as bad as the numbers on their health care plan. https://t.co/tqHKThZRzW pic.twitter.com/IVEIHzQajw

    — Nate Silver (@NateSilver538) November 15, 2017

    Anyone else getting some health care deja vu? https://t.co/niq3JdePsu

    — Daniel W. Drezner (@dandrezner) November 16, 2017

    All I want for Christmas is for Republicans to lose their precious tax cut because they got greedy and couldn’t resist taking one more shot at Obama’s legacy.

    — Schooley (@Rschooley) November 16, 2017

    Liked by 1 person

  31. rikyrah says:

    GOP hopes to boost its popularity with woefully unpopular tax plan
    11/16/17 08:40 AM
    By Steve Benen

    Sen. Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.Va.) boasted yesterday that the goals of the Republican Party’s tax plan “are shared by many Americans.” I’m not sure which polling data the West Virginia senator is reading, but before GOP policymakers radically overhaul the nation’s finances, they may want to consider the actual attitudes of the American mainstream.

    Take, for example, a national Quinnipiac poll released yesterday.

    American voters disapprove 52 – 25 percent of the Republican tax plan…. The wealthy would mainly benefit from this tax plan, 61 percent of American voters say, while 24 percent say the middle class will mainly benefit and 6 percent say low-income people would mainly benefit.

    American voters say 59 – 33 percent that the Republican tax plan favors the rich at the expense of the middle class. […]

    Only 36 percent of voters believe the GOP tax plan will lead to an increase in jobs and economic growth, while 52 percent do not believe it.

    Like

  32. rikyrah says:

    Social Security on the chopping block: How the GOP plans to fix its own budget mess
    Republicans are going back to their dream: Cutting Social Security and Medicare
    CHARLIE MAY
    11.15.2017•10:27 AM

    Amid the impending GOP tax reform bill there has been plenty of talk about the estimated $1.5 trillion slash in taxes, but there has been almost no discussion of how the Republicans — who regularly tout the importance of the federal deficit — plan to pay for their proposed cuts.

    On Tuesday, House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., insisted that the national debt is a serious issue, and that in order for it to be fixed, entitlement programs would have to be gutted in order to pay for the tax cuts.

    “You cannot get the national debt under control, you cannot get that deficit under control, if you don’t do both — grow the economy, cut spending,” Ryan said during a town hall event in Virginia for Fox News.

    Ryan claimed that the Republican tax plan “grows the economy” but that the party has “a lot of work to do in cutting spending.”
    Democrats have said the Republican tax plan is nothing more than a grab for social safety nets.

    “This is a nasty, two-step strategy that has long been the holy grail for hard-right Republicans,” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., told The New York Times. “If this bill passes, you can bet the Republicans will immediately sharpen the knives for middle-class benefits.”

    Like

  33. yahtzeebutterfly says:

    For access to a fabulous resource, you can click on this link to see (and read by downloading) all of the past issues of the Teaching Tolerance magazine:
    https://www.tolerance.org/magazine/archive

    Like

  34. yahtzeebutterfly says:

    Teachers reading here may be interested in this curriculum program:
    Video: “Perspectives for a Diverse America”

    “Teaching Tolerance’s Perspectives for a Diverse America is a literacy-based curriculum that marries anti-bias content with the rigor of the Common Core.”
    perspectives.tolerance.org

    Liked by 1 person

  35. yahtzeebutterfly says:

    On this day, November 16, in 1923, tenor Roland Hayes “…made his official debut in Boston’s Symphony Hall singing Berlioz, Mozart, and spirituals, conducted by Pierre Monteux, which received critical acclaim.” (Wikipedia)


    Published on Youtube Oct 17, 2013 by Edmund StAustell who writes:
    “Roland Hayes (1887-1977) was born in Curryville, Georgia, the son of former slaves. He studied singing at Fisk University in Nashville and began performing publicly in 1911. He studied further in Boston and then London. His early career was in Europe, and when he returned to the United States, in 1923, he was able to come under professional management, and undertook an extensive concert tour that gained him both fame and significant income. If you are interested in Hayes, I would like to invite you to see the latest article on my blog, Great Opera Singers.”

    During the Christmas season you may wish to look up Roland Hayes album. It is beautiful. Here are two of the selections:

    Like

  36. rikyrah says:

    Good Morning, Everyone 😄😄😄

    Liked by 1 person

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