Thursday Open Thread | James Baldwin Week

BALDWIN’S NIGGER – James Baldwin and Dick Gregory

Baldwin’s Nigger 1 of 3

Baldwin’s Nigger 2 of 3

Baldwin’s Nigger 3 of 3

Posted in Arts, Books, Current Events, News, Open Thread, Politics, prejudice, racial hate, Racial Profiling, Racism | Tagged , , | 83 Comments

Donald Trump’s response after being asked about anti-Semitism in the U.S.

Trump didn’t even address Anti-Semitism. This is word salad. He doesn’t have a clue what he is doing. He’s faking it as he goes along. God help us all!

anti-semitism

Posted in Current Events, Foreign policy, News, Open Thread, prejudice, Racism | Tagged , , , , | 38 Comments

Wednesday Open Thread | James Baldwin Week

Happy HUMP Day, Everyone. Hope you’re enjoying James Baldwin week.

giovannisroom

The Unsparing Confessions of ‘‘Giovanni’s Room’

Wiki:  Giovanni’s Room is a 1956 novel by James Baldwin. The book focuses on the events in the life of an American man living in Paris and his feelings and frustrations with his relationships with other men in his life, particularly an Italian bartender named Giovanni whom he meets at a Parisian gay bar.
Giovanni’s Room is noteworthy for bringing complex representations of homosexuality and bisexuality to a reading public with empathy and artistry, thereby fostering a broader public discourse of issues regarding same-sex desire.

Posted in African Americans, Arts, Black History, Media, Open Thread, Politics | Tagged , , , , , , , | 72 Comments

Tuesday Open Thread | James Baldwin Week

Today’s James Baldwin’s feature is The Fire Next Time.”

james-baldwin-9196635-2-402

firenexttime

The Fire Next Time is a 1963 book by James Baldwin. It contains two essays: “My Dungeon Shook — Letter to my Nephew on the One Hundredth Anniversary of Emancipation,” and “Down At The Cross — Letter from a Region of My Mind.” The first essay, written in the form of a letter to Baldwin’s 14-year-old nephew, discusses the central role of race in American history. The second essay deals with the relations between race and religion, focusing in particular on Baldwin’s experiences with the Christian church as a youth, as well as the Islamic ideas of others in Harlem.

The book was first published by The New Yorker and owing to its great success, it was subsequently published in book form by Dial Press in 1963, and in Britain by Penguin Books in 1964; both essays in the book had previously been published in The Progressive and The New Yorker, respectively. Critics greeted the book enthusiastically; it is considered, by some, one of the most influential books about race relations in the 1960s.[1] It was released in an audiobook format in 2008 and narrated by Jesse L. Martin.

The book’s title comes from the couplet “God gave Noah the rainbow sign / No more water but fire next time” in Mary Don’t You Weep, a Negro spiritual.

James Baldwin Speaks! The Fire This Time: A Message to Black Youth

Posted in Books, Media, Open Thread, Politics | Tagged , , , | 34 Comments

Breaking News | National Security Adviser Michael Flynn resigns

national-security-advisor-michael-flynn-resignsNational security adviser Michael Flynn has resigned after reports he misled Trump administration officials about his contacts with Russia’s ambassador to the U.S.

Flynn’s departure less than one month into the Trump administration marks an extraordinarily early shakeup in the president’s senior team of advisers. Flynn was a loyal Trump supporter throughout the campaign, but his ties to Russia caused concern among other senior aides.

Flynn initially told Trump advisers that he did not discuss sanctions with the Russian envoy during the transition. Vice President Mike Pence, apparently relying on information from Flynn, publicly vouched for the national security adviser.

Flynn later told White House officials that he may have discussed sanctions with the ambassador.

Posted in Current Events, Department of Justice, Foreign policy, News, Open Thread | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 74 Comments

Monday Open Thread | James Baldwin Week

Happy Monday, Everyone. This week’s featured artist is Mr. James Baldwin. We’ll look at some of his most acclaimed writings, essays, novels, and TV/radio addresses.

james-baldwin-9196635-2-402

images-2

James Baldwin was an essayist, playwright and novelist regarded as a highly insightful,    iconic writer with works like The Fire Next Time and Another Country.

Born on August 2, 1924, in New York City, James Baldwin published the 1953 novel Go Tell It on the Mountain, going on to garner acclaim for his insights on race, spirituality and humanity. Other novels included Giovanni’s Room, Another Country and Just Above My Head as well as essay works like Notes of a Native Son and The Fire Next Time. Having lived in France, he died on December 1, 1987 in Saint-Paul de Vence.

Writer and playwright James Baldwin was born August 2, 1924, in Harlem, New York. One of the 20th century’s greatest writers, Baldwin broke new literary ground with the exploration of racial and social issues in his many works. He was especially well known for his essays on the black experience in America.

Baldwin was born to a young single mother, Emma Jones, at Harlem Hospital. She reportedly never told him the name of his biological father. Jones married a Baptist minister named David Baldwin when James was about three years old. Despite their strained relationship, he followed in his stepfather’s footsteps—who he always referred to as his father—during his early teen years. He served as a youth minister in a Harlem Pentecostal church from the ages of 14 to 16.

Baldwin developed a passion for reading at an early age, and demonstrated a gift for writing during his school years. He attended DeWitt Clinton High School in the Bronx, where he worked on the school’s magazine with future famous photographer Richard Avedon. He published numerous poems, short stories and plays in the magazine, and his early work showed an understanding for sophisticated literary devices in a writer of such a young age.

images

Go Tell It on the Mountain is a 1953 semi-autobiographical novel by James Baldwin. It tells the story of John Grimes, an intelligent teenager in 1930s Harlem, and his relationship to his family and his church. The novel also reveals the back stories of John’s mother, his biological father, and his violent, religious fanatic step-father, Gabriel Grimes.

The novel focuses on the role of the Pentecostal Church in the lives of African-Americans, as a negative source of repression and moral hypocrisy and also as a positive source of inspiration and community. In 1998, the Modern Library ranked Go Tell It on the Mountain 39th on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century. Time Magazine included the novel in its TIME 100 Best English-language Novels from 1923 to 2005.[1]

Posted in African Americans, Arts, Black History, Books, Civil Rights, Current Events, Education, Freedom, History, Human Rights, Media, Movies, News, Open Thread, Politics, Racism | Tagged , , , , , | 47 Comments

What to do if #ICE Agents show up at your door

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS

ice-agentsice-agents-2

What to do when faced with anti-Muslim discrimination

discrimination-against-immigrants-and-muslims

ENGLISH

https://www.aclu.org/files/kyr/MKG17-KYR-AntiMuslimDiscr-OnePager-English-v01.pdf

Know Your Rights: Discrimination Against Immigrants and Muslims

With discrimination against American Muslims on the rise, KNOW YOUR RIGHTS. Anti-Muslim Discrimination.

ARABIC

https://www.aclu.org/files/kyr/MKG17-KYR-AntiMuslimDiscr-OnePager-Arabic-v01.pdf

Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian)

https://www.aclu.org/files/kyr/MKG17-KYR-AntiMuslimDiscr-OnePager-Indonesian-v01.pdf

URDU

https://www.aclu.org/files/kyr/MKG17-KYR-AntiMuslimDiscr-OnePager-Urdu-v01.pdf

FARSI

https://www.aclu.org/files/kyr/MKG17-KYR-AntiMuslimDiscr-OnePager-Farsi-v01.pdf

Posted in Current Events, Foreign policy, ICEgov, Immigration, Institutional Racism, Jim Crow laws, Muslims, News, Open Thread, prejudice, Racial Bias, Racial Oppression, Racism, Religious oppresion, White Supremacy | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 11 Comments